Archived Story

Black history really just our history

Published 9:00am Wednesday, February 6, 2013

February may be called Black History Month but the celebration is really more about American heritage that impacts people of all races.

Each year a variety of organizations and groups hosts events to showcase black history and shine a light on the contributions that black men and women have made to our nation.

This year is no different with local universities and other groups working on a variety of presentations. It would be a grave mistake to view these offerings as being geared toward only black Americans.

They are not.

Started as a weeklong celebration in 1926 by historian and activist Carter G. Woodson, the celebration was expanded to an entire month in 1976 to mark the nation’s bicentennial. President Gerald R. Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”

Ultimately Black History Month is simply a way to recognize the contributions, many of which are unknown by average citizen.

So we should all take a little time this February to recognize black history, educate our children and acknowledge the diversity that remains an integral part of our nation’s foundation.

 

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