Powdered paint floats in the air as participants in the Color Splash 5K cross the finish line Saturday morning in Central Park in Ashland, Ky.
Powdered paint floats in the air as participants in the Color Splash 5K cross the finish line Saturday morning in Central Park in Ashland, Ky.

Archived Story

Splash of Color

Published 12:05am Sunday, July 28, 2013

 

ASHLAND, Ky. — By mid-morning a purple cloud was likely hanging over Central Park in Ashland, Ky., as 800 runners took off for the inaugural Color Splash 5K run.

Racers arrived to the starting line wearing white T-shirts, as well as some pretty funky accessories — multi-colored knee socks, vibrant sunglasses, even a few rainbow tutus.

Unique to this kind of 5K, however, were the bags of powdered paint handed out to participants. Before the start of the race, seasoned runners and newbies alike doused themselves with every color of the rainbow in celebration of the event.

The starting gun wasn’t even a gun, but a sort of fire extinguisher that blew a cloud of purple paint to signify the race had begun. And when the center street of the park cleared, all that was left was a spectrum on the pavement.

Along the way, runners were splashed with various colors by volunteers on the sidelines, as well as another blast from the purple paint gun at the finish line.

Although the 5K was the first of its kind for Ashland, color-themed runs are not a new phenomenon. At the end of August, The Color Run, a nation-wide race, will go through Huntington, W.Va.

But this was Kelly Daniels’ first experience getting painted from head to toe while running.

“It was fun,” the Ironton native and KDMC neuro nurse said. “I had seen them but they haven’t done any locally.”

Also new to the experience was Kristen Epling from Mingo County, W.Va. This was also Epling’s first 5K.

“It keeps you energized with the colors,” Epling said. “You’re not thinking about how tired you are.”

The event was hosted by King’s Daughters Medical Center’s sports medicine program and Marshall University’s orthopaedics program, with proceeds from the run going to fund a concussion testing and sports physical program for high school athletes.

Dr. Andy Gilliland, with the KDMC sports medicine department, said the inaugural Color Splash run was both great and a disappointment.

Great because so many people participated; a disappointment because registration had to be capped at 800 racers for safety reasons.

But the aim of the race, Gilliland said, was simple.

“We wanted to help reach novice and new runners in a fun way,” Gilliland said.

Sabrina Esenbock, race coordinator and KDMC prevention and wellness manager, agreed.

“We didn’t want to time the race,” she said. “We just wanted people to want to do it and feel like they could run or walk. We were looking for the general public, not just the avid runners.”

Esenbock said hopefully the race will happen again next year.

The Tribune believes it is possible for people with a variety of points of view to discuss issues in a civil manner and will remove comments that, in our opinion, foster incivility. We want to encourage an open exchange of information and ideas. Responsibility for what is posted or contributed to this site is the sole responsibility of each user. By contributing to this website, you agree not to post any defamatory, abusive, harassing, obscene, sexual, threatening or illegal material, or any other material that infringes on the ability of others to enjoy this site, or that infringes on the rights of others. Any user who feels that a contribution to this website is a violation of these terms of use is encouraged to email report-comments@irontontribune.com, or click the "report comment" link that is on all comments. We reserve the right to remove messages that violate these terms of use and we will make every effort to do so — within a reasonable time frame — if we determine that removal is necessary.

Editor's Picks

Finding the money: Boggs wants ideas on how to pay for new jail

Coming up with a specified way to fund building a county jail is the next step in the process, according to jail committee chair Les ... Read more

Feds will prosecute former officers

With three former Lawrence County corrections officers under federal indictment, the county won’t proceed with its case against them. “The charges we filed were similar ... Read more