heels

Archived Story

Tressel teaching at Akron

Published 8:13pm Wednesday, August 21, 2013

The Associated Press

 

It’s now Professor Tressel.

Former Ohio State coach Jim Tressel will teach a course this fall at the University of Akron, where he has worked in an administration role for the past two years. He will instruct students in “General Principles of Coaching” with former Zips coach Jim Dennison, who was Akron’s coach when Tressel began his coaching career at the school as an assistant in 1974.

“He gave me my first opportunity to coach,” Tressel said, “and he provided guidance that has lasted me a lifetime.”

The three-credit course, which will be held once a week and run into December, will be open to Akron students and the general public.

Tressel was forced to resign at Ohio State in 2011 amid a scandal involving several players. He spent 10 years as coach of the Buckeyes, winning a national title in 2002. Tressel became Akron’s vice president of strategic engagement in 2012. In a release from the school, Tressel is referred to as the school’s Vice President for Student Success.

As one of the conditions of a show-cause sanction by the NCAA, Tressel was banned from coaching for five years.

Tressel plans to have current Akron football coach Terry Bowden and men’s basketball coach Keith Dambrot as guest lecturers.

Editor's Picks

Fundraiser set for Coal Grove teen

COAL GROVE — A community-wide effort to win Devyn Pritchard a wheelchair accessible van from a National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association contest fell short earlier ... Read more

Special needs camp teaches bike-riding

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. — The father didn’t want anyone to see, so he tried to casually brush them away. But the tears that welled in his ... Read more

Antique equipment shows off history

Ohio lies in a unique position within the United States, with part of the state situated in the Mid-West and the southeastern portion of the ... Read more

Unexpected heroes

Passersby help people trapped in burning house   Heroes don’t always wear capes, uniforms or badges. They aren’t always scanning the skies, or roaming alleyways ... Read more