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County ESA director touts recent activities

Awareness and training highlighted the Lawrence County Emergency Services Agency’s energetic schedule in recent months, county officials said.

Wednesday, June 06, 2001

Awareness and training highlighted the Lawrence County Emergency Services Agency’s energetic schedule in recent months, county officials said.

"We have been very busy during the last quarter," said Don Mootz, executive director of the agency that oversees 911 and county emergency management.

Hard work by staff members in each department, plus the government and emergency agencies working with the county has led to many positive accomplishments, Mootz said.

Some of the new programs really teach awareness – like school programs, Kids’ Safety Day and activities with the youth – which are something to be proud of, he added.

Projects in the recent quarter included:

– Successful full-scale hazardous materials/disaster exercise held April 21 at Collins Career Center, with more than 17 agencies participating and evaluating.

"I was impressed with the drill and the involvement of more people," Mootz said, adding that it went well because agencies put their disaster response methods to the test.

– Held Kid’s Safety Scenes on May 10 at the vocational school. Developed 13 safety stations with the cooperation of various agencies.

– A team was formed from law enforcement, fire, health and the EMA and trained at the Threat and Risk Assessment class held April 10 in Gallia County.

– Drought threat still imminent. Have one water tank loaned out and bottled water on standby.

– Working with Civil Air Patrol to develop a role for them in the Emergency Operations Center, especially in areas of search and rescue or evacuation.

– In recent weeks, handling reports of flooding and rainstorm damage; coordinating with federal officials.

– Checking into possible future training, such as a disaster recovery course and debris management class.

Key highlights in the agency’s future work includes such training, as well as more safety programs and awareness, Mootz said.

"It’s also important for people to know when there’s a problem, we have ways of connecting people to resources," he said.