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Job fairs set in Allied layoff

AlliedSignal and local government assistance agencies plan job fairs this month for workers who will lose their jobs when Allied hands over chemical production to Reilly Industries.

Wednesday, July 14, 1999

AlliedSignal and local government assistance agencies plan job fairs this month for workers who will lose their jobs when Allied hands over chemical production to Reilly Industries.

About 50 people affected by the production change can meet April 14 and April 28 with Ohio Bureau of Employment Services agents, Workforce Development Resource Center assistants and as many as 20 private companies looking for new hires.

"This is to help secure their future, so they can seek out other options once their jobs end," said Jane Lane Craddock, a job developer with workforce development.

The OBES and Job Training Partnership Act also will conduct a session on benefits that exist for retraining, said John Tohlman of Right Management Consultants, contracted by Allied to work on behalf of employees.

The fair is meant to assist workers in finding future employment or job opportunities that match their current skills, Tohlman said.

Allied’s Ironton facility, which provides about 85 jobs in the city, signed a memorandum of understanding and is in final negotiations with Reilly Industries of Indianapolis, Ind. Reilly will assume orders and production, while AlliedSignal maintains ownership of the plant’s physical structure, said Joe Dotson, Ironton plant manager.

The company wanted to shift its business to one of higher returns, Dotson said, adding that there has been an overall price increase in raw materials and fewer sales because of cheaper import prices.

As part of the sale agreement, the Ironton site will continue producing naphthalene, but will no longer produce binder pitch, creosote or driveway sealer, which led to the planned employee cutbacks.

Allied recently issued letters to prospective employers, advising them of the expected layoffs and inviting them to the no-cost job fairs.

The fairs give employers an opportunity to meet face-to-face with employees, rather than a resume review alone, the letter stated.

The affected employees have experience in a variety of job skills. The letter lists available employees include industrial electricians, chemical operators, heavy equipment operators, supervisors, HVAC technicians, industrial wastewater operators, licensed bargemen, licensed steam engineers, class A maintenance workers, fabricators, ASTM workers, general laborers, security officers, plumbers, pipefitters, certified welders, boiler operators and others.

Companies wanting to participate in the job fairs can reserve space by calling Right Management at 534-5548.

Meanwhile, Allied workers facing unemployment can access help not only for themselves, but also for their spouses at the job fairs.

"We’re trying to give them an opportunity to seek further employment, or go back to school with assistance," Mrs. Craddock said.

If they have to relocate for a job, they might qualify for monetary assistance, she said.

And, included at the job fair will be representatives of temporary employment agencies and companies like Home Interiors, which offer part-time jobs to spouses, Mrs. Craddock said.

And, the doors at the One Stop Center, 120 N. Third St. in Ironton, and at the employment office are always open, she said.