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New officeholders have a job to do

Now that the election is over and Lawrence County has chosen its leaders for the new millennium, there isn’t too much time left to sit back and savor the victories.

Wednesday, November 03, 1999

Now that the election is over and Lawrence County has chosen its leaders for the new millennium, there isn’t too much time left to sit back and savor the victories.

New officeholders have jobs to do, now, before the new year and their terms begin.

Any newcomers have a lot to learn between now and Jan. 1. They should be attending meetings and talking with constituents and officials in their city, village, school district or township to find out not only what issues each group must deal with in the future, but what the citizens hope to accomplish.

Any incumbents have work to do, too. They probably talked to a lot of voters during the campaign season and maybe have a little bit more of a handle on what concerns the citizens have about their community or school district as it heads into the new millennium. Now is the chance for incumbents to take what they have learned and apply it to their vision for the future.

And all those who worked so hard during this year’s campaign deserve a pat on the back, too. Win or lose, it takes a great deal of courage and commitment to put your name on a ballot. The candidates and their families invest a lot of time in the campaigns, giving up many weekends and evenings to get the message to the voters. Being the winner is nice, but having your name on a ballot is an honor, too.

And finally, Lawrence County voters should look at this year’s races as a positive sign for the future of their communities. The large number of people who decided to throw their hats into the ring shows that there are many citizens who not only care about their community’s success, but are willing to put their shoulders to the grindstone to be a part of making those goals a reality.

A community or school district with that kind of support cannot possibly lose.