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Scooter mania

If you’ve driven down the streets of any town, you’ve probably seen kids on scooters.

Thursday, January 11, 2001

If you’ve driven down the streets of any town, you’ve probably seen kids on scooters.

The toy, which was one of the must-have gifts over the holidays, seems to be everywhere.

Scooters aren’t a new concept. The toys have been around since 10-year-olds were making them out of spare wood and roller skates. A similar craze gripped the country in the 80s, but according to Paul Goebel of Ames in Ironton, the new designs have made the scooter popular again.

"These scooters are thin and fast," said Goebel. "They are maybe six inches wide and a foot long. They are lightweight and collapsible. Scooters were popular 13 years ago, but they were big and fat with big wheels. "

The scooters of today are made with lightweight metals and plastics. They feature the same kind of plastic wheels that are used for in-line skates. But according to some Ironton kids, that’s not what makes them popular.

"You can do tricks with them," said Major Brice, who received his scooter for Christmas.

"They’re fun," said Michael Reed. "You can do tricks with them."

Reed’s scooter was purchased the previous November, so he was able to play with his long before many of his friends.

Goebel said that the most popular scooter brand is called the Razor, which Ames doesn’t carry. However, kids in Ironton play with brands like Street Surfer, Blade, Super Scooter and Micro.

One little girl, though, said she’d rather have something else.

"Scooters don’t go fast," said Ariel Schweickart, who’s brother, Jalen, got a scooter for Christmas. "They go slow. I’d rather ride a bike."