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SEOEMS lauded by Aid residents

Residents living near Aid joined county commissioners last week in thanking Southeast Ohio Emergency Medical Service for its lifesaving efforts at the district’s newest ambulance station.

Monday, July 23, 2001

Residents living near Aid joined county commissioners last week in thanking Southeast Ohio Emergency Medical Service for its lifesaving efforts at the district’s newest ambulance station.

"It’s a big asset to us out there," county superintendent Bucky Shafer said during Thursday’s meeting, who lives near SEOEMS’ year-old Aid station.

"My grandson is now out in my yard playing with all he’s got in him, and it’s because of that station," Shafer said.

On June 23, his grandson, Travis, collapsed while playing. The family called 911 and rushed him to the Aid ambulance station, where EMTs and paramedics waited with equipment and a ready vehicle.

Later, doctors and nurses at the hospital told Shafer that had it not been for the ambulance crew, his grandson would not have survived.

"We credit them with saving that little boy’s life," he said.

Shafer congratulated the commissioners and SEOEMS officials, who worked together to build the Aid station, because an ambulance trip used to take 20 minutes just to reach Aid from Ironton. Now, help is only, literally, minutes away, he said.

County commission president Paul Herrell – also an Aid resident – added his own thanks to SEOEMS staff, saying they have improved the quality of life in the county.

"The EMS is like the fire departments Unless your house is on fire, you don’t appreciate them," he said, with a smile. "You do a great job."

SEOEMS executive director Eric Kuhn said the station has been operating at Aid just over a year now, boasting a run volume of about 35 patients per month – more than the 20 to 25 projected before construction.

"Where it used to be 20 to 25 minutes to reach a patient, it takes now five to 10 minutes to get on scene," Kuhn said. "We’re glad it makes a difference in the health of the community."

Shafer’s grandson has not been the only resident helped by SEOEMS in recent months. Heart attack victims, tractor rollover accident survivors and others can also tell tales of gratitude for having a nearby ambulance station, he said.

SEOEMS staff quoted other statistics, one about a serious motor vehicle accident on July 8. Without the Aid station, it would have taken 20 minutes for an ambulance to reach the victims, but instead it took only eight minutes, they said.

Commissioners voted to send a letter of accommodation to the staff of SEOEMS for saving the life of Shafer’s grandson.

"Of all the runs you make, if you save one life, it’s worth it," said commissioner George Patterson, who made the motion.