• 61°

Drugs, thefts on the county docket

A Proctorville man arrested for numerous theft charges and four people arrested on drug charges were among those making appearances Wednesday in Lawrence County Common Pleas Court.

Johnny Lewis, 24, of 6451 County Road 12, Proctorville, pleaded guilty to one count each of theft, burglary, attempted burglary, grand theft and receiving stolen property. In exchange for his guilty plea to these charges, a string of other charges relating to his alleged misbehavior in jail was dismissed.

While incarcerated at the Lawrence County Jail, authorities said Lewis taunted and threatened deputies and corrections officers and at one point even rolled up a wet towel as a weapon.

This came after a report from Shawnee Forensics Center in Portsmouth showed Lewis was competent to stand trial and assist in his own defense.

Judge Charles Cooper sentenced Lewis to a total of four years in prison but gave him credit for time served awaiting resolution of his case.

Lewis apologized to the staff at the jail for his behavior while incarcerated.

“I had mental health issues that were not addressed or I would have avoided some of these charges (that were dismissed),” Lewis said.

Cooper denied a request that Lewis be released on furlough before being sent to prison but said he hoped the sheriff’s office would make every avenue available for him to visit with family while he is in jail.

Also Wednesday, Reginald Nobles, 27, of 1344 Township Road 1194, South Point, was sentenced to a total of five years in prison and ordered to pay $25,000 in fines for his conviction on a four-count drug indictment. He must also surrender his driver’s license for five years.

Jason Shope, 28, of 2206 N. Sixth St., Ironton, was sentenced to a total of four years in prison after he pleaded guilty to a four-count drug indictment.

He must also surrender his driver’s license for two years.

If he stays out of trouble while he is in prison, he may be eligible for judicial release after two years. Judge D. Scott Bowling did allow Shope a brief furlough before reporting to authorities to be sent to prison.

Joe Lewis, 58, of 31 County Road 7C, Ironton, pleaded guilty Wednesday to a nine-count drug indictment.

Bowling sentenced him to a total of four years in prison. However, if he stays out of trouble he may be eligible for judicial release after 18 months if he can get into a community based correctional facility (CBCF)

“The reason we feel this is appropriate under the circumstances is because of the agreement that other charges (pending against Lewis) will be resolved with this,” Lewis’ attorney, Philip Heald said. He added that his client has led a decent life until recently. “He is going to try an avail himself of the opportunities at STAR or some other CBCF after 18 months and I will petition the court at that time.”

In another case, Marvin Salyers, 47, of 2218 S. Fifth St., Ironton, pleaded guilty to one count of trafficking in drugs.

He was sentenced to four years CCS and must complete a rehabilitation program at STAR or another CBCF. He must also surrender his driver’s license for six months and pay a $2,500 fine.

“The reason we approve of this agreement is that it is in the best interest of all concerned,” Salyers’ attorney, Warren Morford said.

“This crime was committed while the my client was under the influence of prescribed medication. I don’t believe he makes a habit of this. He has expressed his remorse to me.”

Jessica Dye, 27, of Ashland, Ky., pleaded guilty to complicity to burglary and Wednesday, she was sentenced to four years community controlled sanctions plus 180 days in the Lawrence County Jail.

Cooper gave her credit for time served in jail and required her to successfully complete a rehabilitation program at the STAR Criminal Justice Center.

She must also pay $31,870 in restitution.

“I believe this is in the best interest of the defendant,” Dye’s attorney, Warren Morford said. “She would like to put this matter behind her. This arose because of her association with a young man. It was not her idea and she did not profit from this. Her codefendant was the one who knew where the stuff was.”