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Honoring those in harm’s way

Reports about emergency personnel appear routinely in this newspaper and others around the country.

Police officers, fire fighters, emergency medical technicians, paramedics and other first responders are the ones who do dangerous work in dangerous circumstances for people in crisis.

The subsequent anniversaries of the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, have been in large part to honor the memories of those innocent victims and that is no different this year. But it has also turned into a day that gives recognition to the people who respond when called to duty.

Sharon Baptist Church of Ironton had a ceremony earlier this week that did just that.

“It’s important we keep the people who died that day in our hearts and minds,” said Ryan Vaughn, chief of the Burlington-Fayette Fire Department. “Little meetings like tonight ensure that we keep our emergency service providers close to our memories.”

The attacks of Sept. 11 will stand as one of the darkest days in American history because of the loss of life that occurred. But it should also stand as a day of pride because it showed the character of a nation filled with people who have always offered a hand to those in need.

“This service was to remind us to always remember the loss of the ones who tremendously gave their lives trying to save others and (those) who love and care for humanity,” said Reda Jarrell, a South Point resident who is a member of Sharon Baptist Church.

That spirit lives in every community in every county in every state in America. People right here at home embody what America represents and that fundamental goodness should never be forgotten.