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Flooding continues; heavy rains still on radar

Just hang on until tomorrow because tomorrow is another — and apparently — drier day. That’s the report from the National Weather Service for the Tri-State.

But getting through the next few hours may be a challenge as a deluge that hit the area in the night continued through the morning.

By 7 a.m. Friday commuters reported that portions of State Route 243 were flooded. That was added to the list the Lawrence County Sheriff’s Office had of flooded roads that included County Roads 91, 181 52, 7C, 31 and 42 and State Route 141.

These are the usual spots for flash flooding, a sheriff’s dispatcher said.

The weather service has issued a flash flood warning through the afternoon and evening with heavy rain continuing through the day. The chance of rain is 100 percent.

However, the sun is expected to shine Saturday bringing a significantly drier weekend.

But as of 9 a.m. Friday Adam Brown on South 11th Street was busy sweeping water out of his basement for the fourth time since June 12. Brown and his family were up through the night watching to see if the rains were coming in.

“The last time we were up was at 6:15,” Brown said. “Then between 6:30 and 7 we had about an inch. If you come up and see it right now, I am sweeping it out by the push broom out the door. I’ve got a houseful of water. At least an inch. Everybody does. I just talked to the neighbors they all have it.”

So far the water hasn’t gotten into the double-wide trailer Betty Joseph lives in on State Route 93. But that’s as far as the good news goes.

“We are flooded about two feet of water in our backyard,” Joseph said this morning. “The creek across 93 backs up on us. It just bubbles back on us. We got people to bring us a couple loads of dirt but that’s not going to do it.”

Brown offered a possible solution for his water woes: putting a special for-sale sign in his lawn that would read “House for Sale. Guaranteed to Flood. $20.”

When the Ironton homeowner went to city council last week, he was told that the recent rains were unique, only coming to the area once every 100 years.

“I guess we’re good for the next 400 years,” Brown said.