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Resigned officer says he was assaulted

The individuals allegedly involved in a bar incident last week that led to the resignation of an Ironton Police officer are keeping quiet about what happened.

Huntington, W.Va., Police say the only report that has been filed regarding the incident was done so by off-duty police officer Brad Layman, a report in which he claims he was assaulted shortly after leaving a downtown establishment.

Huntington Police Sgt. John Williams said Layman told police Aug. 19 that he was assaulted by a group of men as he was walking along Fourth Avenue near Sharkey’s Bar, the establishment at which Layman was alleged to have agotten into an undisclosed incident that led to his resignation from the IPD.

Williams said he was told that Layman might have been involved in a confrontation with a female waitress at Sharkey’s prior to his being assaulted but that he had received no confirmation of details of anything that might have been involved in at the bar.

“Whatever happened in the bar, no report was filed,” Williams said.

Telephone calls made to Sharkey’s manager Summer Ball and owner Don Ours were not returned.

Attempts to contact Layman have also been unsuccessful.

Williams said he did not know Layman was an Ironton Police officer until informed by the media.

Layman handed in a one-sentence resignation to Ironton Police Chief Jim Carey Aug. 20, the day after the alleged Sharkey’s incident. Carey said he had gotten a telephone call from a Huntington bar owner about Layman’s conduct.

Carey has declined to provide specifics about the allegations.

Layman had been employed by the city for approximately two years. He had been an IPD officer once before and resigned after being arrested for drunken driving.

Carey said, if Layman had not resigned, he would have been investigated by Ironton officials for improper conduct.

An investigation into any criminal allegations, by law, would have to be conducted by the Huntington Police because that is where the incident occurred.

Ironton officials can’t prosecute someone for an incident that happened in another city but can, if the person is a city employee, conduct an internal investigation to determine if the matter merits any discipline. Layman’s resignation makes discipline a moot issue.