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Much talk, little action at winter meetings

INDIANAPOLIS — In a town known for fast moves around the speedway, baseball’s wheelers and dealers were slowly mulling their options at the winter meetings.

Roy Halladay, Curtis Granderson and Dan Uggla were some of the big names being dangled on the trade market as baseball’s annual swapfest opened Monday. Toronto appeared to be moving quite deliberately in talks involving Halladay, the much-coveted 2003 AL Cy Young Award winner.

“Nothing’s happened. If he comes to a team in our division, I would be interested. He’s really good,” Boston Red Sox manager Terry Francona said.

Detroit right-hander Edwin Jackson was another player who could be traded, but there were just two minor deals that actually were made in the first few hours of the four-day session.

Washington acquired right-handed reliever Brian Bruney from the New York Yankees for a player to be named and Texas obtained left-hander Clay Rapada from Detroit for a player to be named or cash.

At a hotel just a few miles from Indianapolis Motor Speedway, teams awaited the midnight deadline for free agents to accept arbitration offers from their former clubs. Of the 23 offered arbitration last week, only three accepted: Minnesota pitcher Carl Pavano, Atlanta reliever Rafael Soriano and Colorado reliever Rafael Betancourt.

Among other free agents, St. Louis and right-hander Brad Penny reached a tentative agreement on a $7.5 million, one-year contract, a deal that won’t be completed until after the Cardinals approve the results of his physical Tuesday, a person familiar with the talks said. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the deal was not yet final.

Detroit agreed to a $1.55 million, one-year contract with shortstop Adam Everett. Also, the Yankees said left-hander Andy Pettitte’s representatives told them he wants to return for 2010. New York was prepared to make him an offer upward of $10 million, a baseball official familiar with the talks said. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because talks were ongoing.