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Issue 2 attempts to give legislators total control

Many accusations have been made lately about public employee unions being too strong, and of their protecting under-performing employees.

Job performance is an important consideration in any occupation — especially when it comes to education, the health professions, or public safety. But issues like job security and accountability should be addressed within an employer — union relationship.

To deny employees any bargaining power or means to recourse is a blow against the working class and a step back in time.

Not every last one of teachers, nurses, law enforcement officers, and other public employees are completely dedicated to their professions.

But why would anyone expect that politicians would be more concerned with the education of our children, or our health and safety than the men and women who choose to make those endeavors their life work?

Politicians, unfortunately, seem more and more concerned with pleasing their particular financial backers and getting votes in the short term than with the long-term well-being of us all.

If our legislators believe accountability or wages or benefits are problems in our education, health, public safety, or law enforcement systems, let them make specific proposals to remedy the problems, and take those specific proposals before the public if necessary.

Giving politicians absolute power to dictate contract terms to our educators, health professionals and law enforcement officials is not the answer.

I’ll definitely be voting “no” on Issue 2.

Steve Belcher

Ironton

Nation’s coal miners need support from Obama

The recent news that the Big Sandy Power Plant near Louisa, Ky.,0 will continue to operate as a coal-burning electrical generation plant should be a cause for celebration throughout its’ distribution area.

I applaud Ky. Power Co. President Greg Pauley’s decision to keep it coal.

It’s good to see a president that appreciates coal!

From Day 1, President Obama has been against coal. He has allowed the EPA to promulgate its own rules that have sent miners home due to the stalling-out effect of their rules on the industry.

Further, the recent action by the EPA to reject 19 Kentucky surface mining permits will be a major blow to coal miners.

By this letter, I am asking every Tribune reader to contact your elected officials and encourage them to get the EPA off our backs.

I am also inviting President Obama to come to Appalachia to talk to us.

I don’t necessarily need to meet him, but other people within the mining industry, in higher positions than mine, would like to sit down and talk to him about mining, the EPA and keeping coal miners working.

Our miners play a big part in this country and they need your attention, Mr. President. They do know how to vote, too.

Thank you and RSVP,

John F. Enyart

Ashland, Ky.