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Rep. Johnson gets update on bridge construction

JESSICA ST. JAMES/THE TRIBUNE  Congressman Bill Johnson (Rep-6) speaks with workers from ODOT on Wednesday.

JESSICA ST. JAMES/THE TRIBUNE
Congressman Bill Johnson (Rep-6) speaks with workers from ODOT on Wednesday.

United States Congressman Bill Johnson (R-6) on Wednesday stopped in Lawrence County to tour and receive an update on the ongoing Ironton-Russell Bridge Construction.

After meeting with the Scioto County Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 577, Johnson crossed into Kentucky purposely to traverse the current bridge on his trek into Ironton; he reiterated the importance of the project.

“Crossing the current bridge makes it obvious why there’s a need for a new one,” he said. “The federal government does a lot of things it should do and a lot of things it shouldn’t do; this is one of the things it should do.”

Joining Rep. Johnson on the tour were operating engineers, cement masons, carpenters, laborers, ironworkers and millwrights. Vaughn Wilson of the Ohio Department of Transportation and Mark Johnson of Tri-State Building Trades also toured the bridge.

“Construction is going pretty well,” David Bame, project engineer, said. “We had a tough winter so we lost a few days but that’s expected.”

Rep. Johnson said he supports the Davis-Bacon Act, a 1931 that established the requirement for paying the local prevailing wages on public works projects for laborers.

“Projects like this are what the federal government should be focused on,” Johnson said. “Commerce on the Ohio River depends on our bridges, lochs and dams. Building this bridge supports economic vitality not only in Ohio and Kentucky, but for the skilled workers who bring their expertise to the table every day on this project.”

The bridge should be complete by February 2016. one,” he said. “The federal government does a lot of things it should do and a lot of things it shouldn’t do; this is one of the things it should do.”

Joining Johnson on the tour were operating engineers, cement masons, carpenters, laborers, ironworkers and millwrights. Vaughn Wilson of the Ohio Department of Transportation and Mark Johnson of Tri-State Building Trades also toured the bridge.

“Construction is going pretty well,” David Bame, project engineer, said. “We had a tough winter so we lost a few days but that’s expected.”

Rep. Johnson said he supports the Davis-Bacon Act, a 1931 that established the requirement for paying the local prevailing wages on public works projects for laborers.

“Projects like this are what the federal government should be focused on,” Johnson said. “Commerce on the Ohio River depends on our bridges, lochs and dams. Building this bridge supports economic vitality not only in Ohio and Kentucky, but for the skilled workers who bring their expertise to the table every day on this project.”

The bridge should be complete by February 2016.one,” he said. “The federal government does a lot of things it should do and a lot of things it shouldn’t do; this is one of the things it should do.”

Joining Johnson on the tour were operating engineers, cement masons, carpenters, laborers, ironworkers and millwrights. Vaughn Wilson of the Ohio Department of Transportation and Mark Johnson of Tri-State Building Trades also toured the bridge.

“Construction is going pretty well,” David Bame, project engineer, said. “We had a tough winter so we lost a few days but that’s expected.”

Rep. Johnson said he supports the Davis-Bacon Act, a 1931 that established the requirement for paying the local prevailing wages on public works projects for laborers.

“Projects like this are what the federal government should be focused on,” Johnson said. “Commerce on the Ohio River depends on our bridges, lochs and dams. Building this bridge supports economic vitality not only in Ohio and Kentucky, but for the skilled workers who bring their expertise to the table every day on this project.”

The bridge should be complete by February 2016.