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More than produce

THE TRIBUNE/JESSICA ST JAMES A member of the Ani Tsalagi New Generation group, meaning many Cherokee, performed Saturday at the Ironton Farmers Market.

THE TRIBUNE/JESSICA ST JAMES A member of the Ani Tsalagi New Generation group, meaning many Cherokee, performed Saturday at the Ironton Farmers Market.

 

The Ironton Farmers Market has grown to the point it is literally overflowing with vendors. More homegrown produce is arriving every week as well as homemade items such as candy and baked goods. Now in its second season, the market continues to not only grow but also become more diverse in terms of what it offers, and not necessarily in regard to food.

Last Saturday market-goers were entertained by the Ani-Tsalagi New Generation Cherokee Indian group, which means “many Cherokee.”

“The highlight of the day was the candy dance,” Sam Heighton, market manager, said. “Young guests dance to the Indian drums while circling around candy spread on the ground. When the music stops the dancers can grab all the candy they can until the drums start again.”

The children also learned about Cherokee history. Ironton resident Virginia Cremeans arranged the group’s attendance at the market and said it will most likely return upon Heighton’s request.

This Saturday the Ohio University Southern Art Collaborative will be in attendance to entertain children.

“Do your shopping and take home your child’s masterpiece,” Heighton said. “Also on Saturday we’ll have live music by Bruce Brown and the Kelley’s Bridge Band. Enjoy the music and shop the market.”

The market is open 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Friday and Saturday on South Second Street in downtown Ironton. It is a project of Ironton aLive and is sponsored by Our Lady of Bellefonte Hospital.