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Rains don’t keep crowds away from Octoberfest

The Chesapeake Firehouse Puppy Dog high fives eventgoers during the annual Chesapeake Octoberfest parade Saturday.

The Chesapeake Firehouse Puppy Dog high fives eventgoers during the annual Chesapeake Octoberfest parade Saturday.

CHESAPEAKE — Kaelin Whitmore of Chesapeake intently scooped up the colored sand to put inside the glass ornament she held. She was waiting to put her favorite color in last to top it off with a splash of pink.

Kaelin was creating sand art at the booth set up by Big Branch Church as part of Saturday’s annual Octoberfest in the village of Chesapeake.

Friday’s rains may have left the ground at Triangle Park in the village soggy at places, but it didn’t dampen the mood of those attending this year’s festival.

“For the weather, the turnout is really good,” Chesapeake Mayor Dick Gilpin said as he indulged in a bowl of chili from the Chesapeake United Methodist Church’s booth. “I am pleased. Some of the things didn’t show because of the weather like the horses.”

Carriage and pony rides had been on tap, but despite that Triangle Park was packed with booths ranging from Dan Fulks and his famous bean dinner to face painting.

Shelby Goodrich was giving five-minute massages for a donation to the Chesapeake Methodist Church’s MOPS organization.

Goodrich recently set up a massage therapy studio inside Island Ray’s Salon by Sam’s Club in South Point.

“Massage decreases stress and anxiety,” she said. “It increases circulation and muscle tone.”

Goodrich does both full body relaxation and therapeutic massage that focuses on specific areas.

Besides sand art the congregation from Big Branch was offering games for the youngsters and giveaways for teens. The church sets up a booth each year at the festival.

“We use this as an opportunity for outreach and to minister to the kids of the community,” pastor Randy Henderson said. “To us this is good. This is very beneficial.”

Later in the day the church’s band and praise team performed under the direction of Dr. Michael Black and Kelly Brock.

Food vendors offered a range of treats from corn dogs to barbecued ribs to deep fried peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.

“It is short and they see a lot of people they know,” Gilpin said. “It is economical. There’s good entertainment. A good time was had for all.”