Bundle of joy comes sooner than expected

Published 10:21 am Thursday, June 11, 2015

Amanda and Cody Ingels with their newborn son Tyson while at Cabell Huntington Hospital. Tyson’s mother delivered him at the family home in Pedro.

Amanda and Cody Ingels with their newborn son Tyson while at Cabell Huntington Hospital. Tyson’s mother delivered him at the family home in Pedro.

 

Tyson Alexander Ingels became part of a very elite club on Monday.

That’s because he was born right here in Lawrence County. Following the closure of River Valley Hospital in 2001, expecting parents usually have their children in one of the Tri-State’s other hospitals. Very few have been born in Lawrence County since.

Wrapped in a blanket covered in green, blue and orange stars, Tyson heard what will probably become one of the many tellings and retellings of how he came to be in this world. That was Tuesday at Cabell Huntington Hospital as his mother and father, Amanda and Cody Ingels, of Pedro, recalled his unexpected delivery.

Amanda’s labor was scheduled to be induced on Wednesday, but Tyson had other plans.

“I got up and I started hurting a little bit,” Amanda said. “My mom asked if I wanted her to call Cody. I knew it was contractions but I knew it was nothing serious. I tried to get in the tub to ease it.”

Amanda said she hurt for about 30 minutes before the call was made to Cody, who was working at Fout Brothers Metal Prep. Her mother tended to her other two sons, ages 4 and 1.

“I made it from Hog Run to Pedro in 6 minutes,” Cody said.

But it was too late. Tyson was born about two minutes before Cody could make it to the bathroom, where Amanda gave birth.

“It just happened so fast,” Amanda said.

So fast that Tyson was born en caul, meaning the amniotic sac — an opaque bubble that covers all babies in the womb from right after conception — didn’t break.

That’s when Cody jumped into action.

“I grabbed the (sac) and ripped it apart,” Cody said. “That’s when we called the doctor.”

At the doctor’s instructions, Cody tied a bread tie around the umbilical chord, wrapped the baby in a blanket and waited for EMS to arrive.

“They let me hold him in the ambulance,” Amanda said of her first ambulance ride.

Tyson weighed 6 pounds 10 ounces and was 19 inches long. He was expected to return home with his family on Wednesday.