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Family Medical Centers sponsor bicycle safety event

Two-year-old Paeson Mineer rides through the obstacle course with John Dickess in tow during National Health Center Week bike.

Two-year-old Paeson Mineer rides through the obstacle course with John Dickess in tow during National Health Center Week bike.

 

Sporting his new bicycle helmet, 2-year-old Paeson Mineer rode his tricycle around the safety course at the Bike Rodeo Tuesday at St. Mary’s Family Medical Center in Ironton. Paeson, along with other young people, received a free helmet and bicycle safety information at the event.

“We just wanted him…to get used to being around bicycles,” said Tracy Mineer, Paeson’s mother. “He was pretty excited.”

Before hopping on his bike and riding around the course, 7-year-old Dominic Johnson got fitted for a new bicycle helmet.

Dominic’s grandmother, Barbara Campbell, believes the event was a valuable opportunity to learn about bicycle safety.

“It’s necessary,” said Campbell.

The rodeo was part of the Family Medical Center’s celebration of National Health Center Week and was sponsored through the Ironton and Lawrence County health departments along with AutoZone and the Lawrence County Sheriff’s Office.

“This is the first time we’ve ever done this,” said Family Medical Centers’ pediatrician Dr. Kim Oxley who helped organize the event along with Dr. Ryan Brislin.

“The kids are excited.”

“It’s a collaborative effort,” said Laura Brown, Ironton Health Department health commissioner, who helped fit children for helmets at the rodeo.

“The main thing is making sure (young people) wear helmets,” said Brown.

The aim in giving the youth helmets was to cut down on the number of head injuries related to bicycle accidents.

John Dickess, of Dickess Auto Repair and Don Schwartz, from AutoZone, guided young people through the safety course and checked for missing chain guards, broken handle bars, or low tire pressure on the bikes. The event is a way to make young people and their parents aware of bicycle safety hazards, said Schwartz.

“We’re just helping the kids,” said Dickess. “It’s all about the kids.”

“We believe in it,” said Schwartz.

After the young people completed the course and their bikes were evaluated for safety, young people were awarded bicycle safety certificates by Scott Wilson with the Lawrence County Sheriff’s Office.

The event was a way to help young people learn about bicycle safety and to encourage them to be active, said Oxley.

“We do see a lot of injuries (related to biking),” said Oxley. “We try to reinforce safety.”