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Pointers praised for being ‘outstanding’ class

SOUTH POINT — Just minutes before the South Point High School Class of 2016 processed into the gymnasium on Sunday, seniors were nervously adjusting their caps, gowns and chords of academic achievement.

Some checked his or her reflection in the mirror image of a cell phone camera, making sure everything was in its right place.

“I’m very happy, but very, very nervous at the same time,” said Olivia Abner, who would lead her class in the procession march.

Mostly, that nervousness came from the thought of having to walk across a stage in front of so many people, she said. But, a little bit came from the thought of living on her own this fall as she starts classes at the University of Cincinnati Clermont College.

Abner said she will study to become an athletic trainer and will play volleyball for the school.

The nervousness seemed to be common among the seniors who were arranging themselves in alphabetical order.

Twin sisters Karah and Julie Davis are attending different schools in the fall. Karah, who will attend Ohio University Southern, said she was nervous for this new phase in her life to begin.

“Doing everything on your own,” she said.

Julie, who will attend Lee University in Tennessee, said she was “really excited.”

“I love it there,” she said.

Erika Duede said the feeling of graduating was exciting, yet bittersweet. She will attend Shawnee State University.

Others were already looking beyond high school and excited to leave it behind.

Maggie Dyer said she was hopeful to start as a tattoo artist apprentice, while Michael Fetty wanted to get into the X-ray tech field.

No matter their career paths, South Point High School Principal Ben Coleman said the class of 2016 was “outstanding” and that there were “a lot of leaders in it.”

“This class was unique because there was a mix of everything you could imagine in a class,” Coleman said. “You’ll have some successful tradesmen and women. Some will be billionaires. There are many talented athletes.”

Of the well-rounded class, Coleman had one last bit of wisdom.

“Congratulations,” he said. “Now life begins.”