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Wade joins KCU’s first signing class

South Point Pointers’ senior pitcher Logan Wade signed a letter-of-intent on Thursday to play for the Kentucky Christian University Knights. Attending the signing ceremony were: seated left to right, sister Hannah Wade, mother Jodi Wade, Logan, father Brian Wade and Kelli Jenkins; standing left to right, South Point head coach Larry Goodwin, KCU head coach Chris Hensley and Zach Jenkins. (Tim Gearhart of Tim’s News & Novelties, Park Ave. in Ironton)

Jim Walker
jim.walker@irontontribune.com

SOUTH POINT — Chris Henley is starting the baseball program at Kentucky Christian, so naturally he’s been looking for starting pitching.
He found some.
Hensley bolstered his roster with a projected starting pitcher by signing South Point Pointers’ senior Logan Wade on Thursday.
“I was looking at recruiting sites and I ran across a kid from South Point. I talked to a couple of people and they said he is a quality pitcher,” said Hensley. “We started texting one night and I asked if he committed to anybody and he said ‘no’ and the next thing you know he’s out there visiting the college and  that day we signed him.
“He’s just what we’re looking for, a quality kid. We’ve got him and Dylan Gifford from Boyd County. Those two kids are almost identical. They’re top pitchers.”
Wade was interested in KCU for several reasons, not just the fact he could continue his baseball career.
“I liked the campus. It was real nice and everybody was nice to me. They welcomed me and that’s just where I want to be,” said Wade who also liked the fact that KCU is a Christian-based school.
“I’ve been a Christian my whole my life and been going to church and that’s something I like.”
Wade began playing baseball in the little leagues and added summer travel ball to his schedule. He said the idea of playing at the next level was always a dream.
“It was in my head. I wanted to go to college and play baseball,” said Wade. “Baseball has always been my favorite sport. I’ve always worked on it the hardest and put in the most time in.”
With KCU starting a program, getting in on the ground floor should help Wade’s chances of playing in his first season. Hensley said he fully expects it.
“It’s up to him. My prediction is he and the boy from Boyd County are going to be starting pitchers. I’m going to give them the ball, we’re going to be young, and they’ve got to learn. But I think they have the ability to step right in the first year and compete.”
Being part of the Mid-South Conference will make for quite a challenge for Wade and his KCU teammates.
“We’ll have our hands full, but the team we’re putting together 80 percent of them are local boys,” said Hensley.
Wade actually improved his baseball chances thanks to cross country and basketball.
Wade was a standout on the Pointers’ basketball team and he credits much of his success this past season — and to his pitching this season — with a big weight loss. The 6-foot-4 Wade slimmed down from 260 to 210.
“I ran cross country and the running helped and not drinking pop or eating after eight (p.m.),” said Wade. “I’ve been able to move better. I’m quicker. It’s helped me with pitching, too. My mechanics are better.”
Wade — who also plays first base — said he would welcome a chance to play on a daily basis, but he would prefer pitching.
“I think pitching is my best. I played position pretty good and I hit pretty good, too, but pitching is my best,” said Wade.
“It’s up to him. My prediction is he and the boy from Boyd County are going to be starting pitchers. I’m going to give them the ball, we’re going to be young, and they’ve got to learn. But I think they have the ability to step right in the first year and compete.”
Wade plans to get a teaching degree in elementary math.